Appsmith has been certified SOC 2 Type II
30
September
2022
Announcement

Appsmith has been certified SOC 2 Type II

Appsmith has been certified SOC 2 Type II
Rishabh Kaul
0
 minutes ↗
#
security
#
compliance
Announcement

Appsmith is excited to announce that we've completed our System and Organization Controls (SOC) 2 Type II audit. This audit is yet another demonstration of our importance on security at Appsmith. 

Being an open-source project that is geared towards self-hosting, security has been at the heart of everything we’ve done. From making it super easy to self host Appsmith, to not storing any data returned from user’s API/DB queries, to encryption, SSO, access controls, and more, we’ve always taken a security-first approach to build Appsmith. 

In addition, each code commit is analyzed by multiple static code analysis tools; we use Snyk, Deepsource and Dependabot. We also do regular third-party vulnerability & penetration tests. 

You can read more about Appsmith’s security initiatives here.

Arpit Mohan, our Co-founder and Chief Technology Officer, leads our security initiatives. Arpit is a technology veteran and has 13 years of experience building enterprise-grade software as an engineering leader across industries like cloud communications (Exotel), payments (Ezetap, now part of Razorpay), and consumer (Cultgear), in addition to founding 3 previous startups. 

What is a SOC 2 Type II audit? 

The SOC 2 audit is a highly recognized audit to certify the information compliance of a company. The criteria for the audit are set forth by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). Third-party auditors can use these criteria to validate information security at companies like Appsmith. This independent attestation of security controls is crucial for Appsmith’s users, particularly those in highly-regulated industries. 

While the SOC 2 Type I audit looks to check whether a company has put in place controls at a given point in time, SOC 2 Type II is more rigorous and observes how effective these controls are over an extended period of time (typically 6-12 months).  

For our Type II audit, we worked with Certpro, a third-party auditor who conducted a thorough review of our internal security controls. These include our policies, procedures, backup and disaster recovery, infrastructure regarding change management, logical access, security incident response, and data security. We used Sprinto to ensure that we're following industry-standard security practices.

What does the SOC 2 Type II audit mean for our users? 

Simply put, the SOC 2 certificate further improves Appsmith Cloud — and demonstrates our long-held commitment to security as an integral part of Appsmith. And since Appsmith Cloud runs the same code as the Community Edition and Business Edition self-hosted versions, our self-hosted users can be assured that the Docker containers being run in their environments are also built using the same security practices.

Appsmith hits 20000 Stars. How did we get here?
4
August
2022
Announcement

Appsmith hits 20000 Stars. How did we get here?

Appsmith hits 20000 Stars. How did we get here?
Rishabh Kaul
0
 minutes ↗
#
product
Announcement

Day before yesterday we reached 20,000 Stars on Github. 

We’re excited by this number because of what it represents. 20,000 Stars is a milestone that puts us in the company of other exciting open source projects that we all use and love. 

It’s been a steady rise. Since our launching on Github in mid 2020, it’s taken us a little over 2 years to reach this milestone. In June last year, we wrote about our learnings while hitting 4500 Stars. Since then, we’ve gotten a 4.4x jump since. 

How did we get here?

There’s a big debate in the open source community around the value of Github Stars. One Stack Overflow question laments "GitHub Stars" is a very useful metric. But for *what*?

We look at Github Stars as an informal measure of popularity of an open source project. And so while there might exist popular projects with low Stars, projects with high Stars more often than not command some mindshare. 

So while we keep an eye on this metric, it’s definitely not something we lose sleep over. 

Our philosophy has been to focus on things that add value to developers worldwide and focus methodically initiatives that further that cause. And so here are the things we’ve been doing (with pride)

Committing (Code)

We’ve been shipping. A LOT. And it's getting noticed. The folks at OSSInsight have been tracking and ranking various open source projects. We've submitted the highest number of pull requests among all low code development platforms. What makes this more interesting (and exciting) is that the definition of a low code platform according to OSSInsight is quite broad, including companies like Hasura, Supabase, Strapi.

And Appsmith continues to lead this chart month over month. 

Our users are noticing this too.

In addition to new users discovering us from word of mouth, we’re also seeing a lot of existing users returning back to Appsmith citing how much better the platform has gotten since they last tried it.

Even though our primary aim has been to educate our users about new features releases, bug fixes and helping users create bettet software, we started noticing that a lot of developer media began picking up our updates. This was very exciting to observe. Devops.com covered our version control, New Stack highlighted our OSS approach, JAXenter covered our JS Editor launch, and SD Times featured us not once, but twice as their Project of the Week (the second time was probably due to our fundraise). 

Retention over Acquisition

We made a conscious call in 2020 to focus on retention and user education over user acquisition. The good folks at Threado covered our early community-building efforts some time back

We believed as long as we served users via solving bugs, prioritizing features they asked for, and making ample content to help people get the most out of the platform, word of mouth would take care of acquisition. 

We launched our discourse community to create a Q&A type knowledgebase. In addition to helping our existing users and reducing load on our support team, it’s also becoming a growing source of organic traffic and bringing in new users (plausible data only from Apr 22) 

To increase retention, we also created Sample Apps, and Templates to help users understand product features better. While Templates enable a user to see a fully functional application that’s ready to be forked (like a dashboard or admin panel), Sample Apps have a narrower scope to help users perform a specific functions like How to implement a Search / Filter functionality in a Table with MongoDB as a datasource. This is in addition to the videos and blogs we’ve been regularly publishing around use-cases and investing in robust documentation. We’re slowly seeing the fruits of this from a new user acquisition perspective kick in because this type of content is also great for SEO. 

Highlighting Self Hosting

One of the early calls we made was to ensure that we made it easy for people to self-host Appsmith because that's how a lot of our users preferred using the platform. This is also reflected in our outreach efforts; you might see us plugging in links to our Github repo often (more so than website). The self host option is also prominently featured on our website's “hero section”.

Communicating across channels: Feature Updates, Opinions and Engaging Developers

We've been actively answering questions and sharing our feature releases on Reddit, Twitter, HackerNews and community forums of our integration partners. None of these channels individually bring a massive spike to traffic, but instead send a steady stream of consistent traffic to us every month and brings in a lot of new users to our Github repo. Like our July updates which is being received well from the Reddit community.

Word of Mouth 

While our team continues to actively monitor and post our opinions on these platforms, increasingly we’ve started noticing that our users have started talking about us. For example, user comments on HackerNews like these make our day. All in, across Github and our website, 3rd party forums are increasingly contributing anywhere from 4-6K unique hits a month across our websites and Github. 

A lot of our users are also writers, empowered by platforms like Medium or Dev.to or Hashnode and many of them have started featuring us in tutorials or listicles. This has lead to a massive spike in traffic, and my hunch is increasingly becoming a big contributor to our star growth. 

Podcasts

For awareness, we had to be surgical. Instead of spending effort on SEO or ads, we decided to go after podcasts. Why? Laser focused target audience that resonates with the problem. Check. Organic backlinks. Check. Ample time to go deep into product, technology and how/why we’re building. Check. People who know what they’re talking about (our founders basically). Check. Till date we’ve recorded 15 podcasts (with 11 of them live) with an estimated cumulative 100K listens. All this in less than a 6 months. Check out Nikhil on JAMStack Radio or Arpit on Hanselminutes.  

Github Juice

Github is possibly the last true organic platform. We’ve benefitted immensely from Github’s organic traffic. We’re not quite sure how Github’s “trending” algorithm works, but we’ve been consistently been “trending” in a bunch of sub-topics like JavaScript, TypeScript, Projects from India. But this often ends up becoming a domino effect, where because we’ve been doing a lot of the things above, there are people who discover us and star us, which in turn makes us trend, bringing in further Stars.  

As a parting note, this is just the start. And we can’t wait to see what the future holds and we’ve got so many exciting features we’re working on (and yes bug fixes too). We’ll keep executing and serving our users. Do try out Appsmith incase you haven’t already or share it with developers in your team. Want to get more involved? Maybe contribute to the project or better still, join us if you want to be a part of an organization that is building something meaningful for developers worldwide.

Build Custom UI on top of Airtable data
25
July
2022
Announcement

Build Custom UI on top of Airtable data

Build Custom UI on top of Airtable data
Rishabh Kaul
0
 minutes ↗
#
integrations
#
databases
#
announcement
Announcement

Today, our integration with Airtable comes out of beta and is available for everyone 🎉! You can now build custom UIs and interact with applications built on Airtable, with minimal configuration.

While it is possible to use the default API interface to connect to Airtable, we wanted to make it easier for you to directly connect your Airtable account and create applications faster than ever. This new data connector introduces a number of features:

  • Integration located in the “Datasources” section
  • Connect to your Airtable account with either an API Key or a Bearer Token (OAuth 2.0)
  • Create queries to fetch, create, retrieve, update and delete data from a datasource using the Appsmith query editor. 
  • List command lets you display all the data from Airtable, and can also present data that has been filtered and sorted based on fields, records, time zones, etc. 

For details and information on how to use this new integration (with videos!), check out our Airtable documentation here. See it in action on our full tutorial here, where we build an issue tracker with Airtable as backend. As always, let us know what you think!

In 9 Months, 4500 People Starred Appsmith on Github. What Do We Know About Them?
1
June
2021
Product

In 9 Months, 4500 People Starred Appsmith on Github. What Do We Know About Them?

In 9 Months, 4500 People Starred Appsmith on Github. What Do We Know About Them?
Rishabh Kaul
0
 minutes ↗
#
open-source
#
github
#
community
#
general-advice
Product

It’s been only about 9 months since Appsmith became a GitHub project. Since then we’ve amassed about 4500 stars, which is a simple way for GitHub users to bookmark repositories that interest them. We’ve been very curious to learn more about these people. Who are they? What are they like? Are there things we could do to accelerate awareness and interest?

I recently came across this incredible post from Spencer Kimball (CEO, CockroachDB) based on the code that he wrote many year back and thought of running it over our Stargazers to learn more.

Why did we do this?

As a project which took an open source turn, we’ve been building in public. Most of our team members are going out and answering questions on Discord, Github, Reddit, Hacker News and Twitter. A lot of what we achieve is going to be determined by the community that we build. We like to think of stars as bookmarks and while we’re thrilled at our star growth, we also know that it’s often just one of the many indicators we’d like to consider when learning about how we’re being known in the wider technology ecosystem. The ultimate joy is going to be to see people build and use our product and there’s no replacement for that and the team is burning the midnight oil to gather feedback, observe usage and be there to help in any way we can.

That being said, given that Spencer did most of the heavy lifting, we were curious to learn more about our Stargazers and see if there’s something we could pick up from this analysis.

How did we get here?

As a project that hasn’t particularly invested in paid marketing, a lot of our outreach has been primarily through engaging with our community and writing content.

Content also has a compounding effect: we can repurpose it, we can start a thread on a new discussion board or link it back to twitter. By going through our cumulative growth in stars over the last 9 months and checking if that overlapped in any major releases or news items gave us a sense of what might have contributed to it.

Content & Community Matters, with a little help from luck.png

In our case, our first major content post which drove traffic was when Arpit (our CTO) wrote about Appsmith (on Hashnode & Dev.to).

Trending on Github gave us an initial bump, however the credit for this goes to the early community that was nurtured which allowed us to trend in the first place.

A big part of our steady growth honestly was just via our team being extremely active on public forums. This Reddit post got us a lot of traffic. As did our showcase on Hacker News . We were also featured in The Hindu (a major newspaper in India). And then sometime in April, something interesting happened, we got a couple of mentions from the community in China and Korea and that led to a lot of users from these places, which in turn led us getting mentioned in RunaCap’s list of most popular Github Projects in Q1 of 2021, as well as constantly trending on niche categories of Github.

In the meantime, we’re continuously coming up with a lot of listicles around low code platforms like this , this or this . None of these by themselves are needle moving, but together they all add up and it helps that this category is gaining traction.

Needless to say, we intend to continue to invest heavily in content, from tutorials to showcasing how our community is using Appsmith to other learnings around building software and teams.

Where are our Stargazers coming from?

In total, our Stargazers are from over a 100 countries. This data however isn’t complete since getting the exact location from a Github profile often becomes tricky. Why? For starters, only 60% of our Stargazers mentioned a location. Within these, folks have mentioned multiple locations, misspelled names or mentioned places like Mars ;)

However, from an indicative perspective, these are the top 25 countries.

Users who star_ We are one world.png

For our team at Appsmith, at the very least, it means having a global outlook towards our community, as well as keeping a lookout on certain geographies, where we might see Appsmith suddenly gain traction.

What else are our Stargazers checking out?

Starring on Github is super easy and people can go trigger happy with it. Still, analyzing the other repositories our Stargazers star gives us a directional sense of their interests. Our Stargazers starred a total of 247K repos. Of these, 222K repos had < 5 stars, which sorta points towards a power law that we’ve come to expect from social networks.

Here are the top 20 repositories

Screenshot 2021-05-30 at 8.31.26 AM.png

Our users love dev tools which should come as no surprise. Some common themes that are noticeable here: Tools that make it easy to create UI, tools that help automate workflows and tools that help on the database side of things. And since Appsmith is highly relevant to users trying to accomplish each of these things, it makes sense that these end up becoming the most correlated repos.

How much do our Stargazers contribute to open source projects?

29.1% (1310) of our Stargazers have made atleast 1 commit to a repository. repository. In total, our Stargazers made about 379K commits, of which the top 10 contributed 127K commits (or 33.5%). Spencer was kind enough to include some base criterion in his code to make the numbers palatable: only repositories with > 25 stars or 10 forks, or 10 open issues were included. This puts the average number of commits at 289 with a median number of commits at 46.

The top 20 active Stargazers had these impressive stats

Screenshot 2021-06-01 at 5.57.41 AM.png

A Networked Platform

Do our Stargazers follow each other? If so, to what extent. To make the data meaningful, we decided to go with only those Stargazers that had atleast 10 followers. This gave us a dataset of 2214 (~49%) Stargazers. Plotting the distribution bases % of shared followers, we see that for 62% of our Stargazers, there was an overlap of atleast 40% of their followers with other Stargazers of the Appsmith repo. Talk about a networked platform! And since we get followers from many countries, we can be reasonably certain that such a networked effect isn’t restricted to one or two locations.

Distribution of Shared Followers with Appsmith's Stargazers.png

Attributes of our new Stargazers

One additional thing that Spencer included in his code was to look at the follower and commit activity of Appsmith’s incoming Stargazers. Honestly, we’re not quite sure of what to make of this data except that there’s a positive (albeit weak) correlation between average follower count and average commits on Github.

Average Followers & Commits for new Appsmith stargazers.png

Why not try it yourself?

Go ahead and use the Stargazers repo yourself to analyze yours (or anyone else’s) repo’s trends. Depending upon the number of Stargazers you have, it can take some time. It took us about 7-8 hours (with a 5K/Hr rate limit).

And incase you're fed up of spending months building internal tools, dashboards, admin panels and what not or are just curious about why these 4500+ folks starred Appsmith, do check it out here !

Launching Betasmith: The Appsmith Beta Community
11
June
2021
Announcement

Launching Betasmith: The Appsmith Beta Community

Launching Betasmith: The Appsmith Beta Community
Rishabh Kaul
0
 minutes ↗
#
open-source
#
community
Announcement

We’re thrilled to launch Betasmith: The Appsmith Beta Community .

Since our inception, we’ve relied on the community to help us decide what to build. With Betasmith, we want to involve our users even more deeply in our product development process.

Do you want to have a say on the future of Appsmith? Do you like the idea of sharing ideas to help shape the future of the product? Or maybe even be the first to test out our new features?

Well, we’d love to hear from you.

What's more you'll gain access to our previews and be able to take part in private interviews and other treats along the way. You can be a part of our Beta Community from anywhere in the world.

What can you do as a community member?

💬 Give feedback on early design concepts and prototypes. Sit back and be the judge of the future.

✏️ Participate in research sessions and workshops. Chat directly with our talented designers

🤐 Get early access to new feature previews and demos Who doesn't love being the first to get a new toy?

Ready to sign up? We can’t wait for you to help shape the future of Appsmith. ‍ Sign up here